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The Michael Kiley Scholarship in Antibiotic Resistance

New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) is an enzyme that makes bacteria resistant to a broad range of antibiotics, including antibiotics of the carbapenem family.

“A major objective of the IIDR is to transform scientific discoveries into meaningful solutions for drug-resistant infections (DRIs), with the vision of eliminating the threat of DRIs to human health.”

Michael Kiley was a devoted father and sports enthusiast. He had two major passions in life – baseball and his family. Michael was an avid Blue Jays fan, and proudly coached his son and his friends growing up. Being a father figure to many, Michael loved to watch them shine on the field.

Michael was only 54 when he lost his battle to a drug-resistant ‘superbug’. His infection – short-lived and tragic – was caused by a bacteria that contained a dangerous gene called NDM-1. NDM-1 is just one of several genes that make bacteria resistant to even our last-resort antibiotics. Although these infections take nearly 700,000 lives around the world every year, many are unfamiliar with this devastating ailment.

In an effort to support Micheal’s memory and raise DRI awareness, Micheal’s family runs an annual baseball tournament called the Michael Kiley Classic. As a world-leading center dedicated to combating antimicrobial resistance, the Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research (IIDR) is honored to support the Kiley family’s initiative through The Michael Kiley Scholarship in Antibiotic Resistance. This prestigious award presents IIDR-matched funds raised from the Michael Kiley Classic to an IIDR student pursuing graduate work at McMaster University in the area of drug-resistant infections. Not only does this award support innovative and impactful research initiatives in the field of drug resistance, but allows Michael Kiley’s legacy to continue teaching and inspiring youth.

Author:

Christy Groves