RESOURCES

Trainee Opportunities

Postdoc, Yale University: Emergence of structure and function in groups of phenotypically diverse bacteria. An NIH funded postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Dr. Thierry Emonet, in the Departments of Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology & Physics Yale University. The project combines microbiology, epifluorescence microscopy (possibly including FRET), microfluidics, and mathematical modeling to study the interplay between phenotypic diversity and collective behavior in microbial communities and its role in shaping the emergence of functions and structure at the scale of the entire cell population from local interactions between individuals and with the environment. The project will require making direct comparisons between experiments and theoretical predictions. Applicants should be efficient and self-motivated, with a recent PhD in biology, physics or bioengineering, a track record of productive research – including first author publications, excellent written and verbal communication skills in English, and enjoy working at the interface between microbiology, physics/mathematics, and engineering. Prior experience with bacterial chemotaxis, microfluidics, epifluorescence microscopy, data analysis in MATLAB or python, and or emergent phenomena is preferred but not required. Interested candidates should send an email to thierry.emonet@yale.edu with their CV, a short explanation of their scientific interests and should arrange for two letters of recommendations to be sent directly to Thierry by email.

Postdoc, Yale University: Single cell signal transduction and decision making. A NIH funded postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Dr. Thierry Emonet, in the Departments of Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology & Physics at Yale University. The project combines single-cell FRET measurements in bacteria, microfluidics, with theoretical analysis and predictions to understand how cells extract information from the chemical signals they detect in order to navigate their environment. Of particular interest is to understand the role of fluctuations and phenotypic diversity in this process. Applicants should be efficient and self-motivated, with a recent PhD in biology, physics, bioengineering or related fields, a track record of productive research – including first author publications, excellent written and verbal communication skills in English, and enjoy working at the interface between microbiology, physics/mathematics, and engineering. Prior experience with bacterial chemotaxis, epifluorescence microscopy, microfluidics, Bayesian inference and data analysis in MATLAB or python is preferred but not required. Interested candidates should send an email to thierry.emonet@yale.edu with their CV, a short explanation of their scientific interests and should arrange for two letters of recommendations to be sent directly to Thierry by email.

IIDR Newsletter – Past Editions

CAIN Newsletter – Antimicrobial Resistance: Research & Policy

IIDR Trainee Writing Initiative